2011-11-19 / Front Page

New ‘Maynard bridge’ dedicated

Veterans Day was memorable in Coudersport as a fallen hero from the Vietnam War received a long-overdue honor at the same time a new bridge was dedicated.

Several family members were present as Army Sergeant Bruce C. Maynard was memorialized with the naming of the new Seventh Street Bridge in his honor.

In a brief and emotional ceremony, American Legion Post 192 representative Dick Chapell and Coudersport Borough Manager Marlin Dale Moore presented a framed verse to Sgt. Maynard’s brother, Tom, “on behalf of a grateful nation.”

Many of those in attendance fondly remembered Bruce Maynard as a childhood friend who always enjoyed “playing Army.”

“That was something that always stood out to me, was how much Bruce liked to play war when we were hanging around the neighborhood in Rubbertown,” recalled Roger Butz, who with his brother Wilson stood in quiet honor to their childhood friend as a Post 192 bugler played “Taps.”


Long-time Coudersport resident Tom Maynard (seated) joined Borough Manager “Mud” Moore (right) in a ribbon cutting and unveiling ceremony dedicating the Sergeant Bruce C. Maynard Bridge on Seventh Street. American Legion Post 192, represented above by Dick Chapell, participated in a moving ceremony that recalled Maynard’s heroism. Several other family members attended. Long-time Coudersport resident Tom Maynard (seated) joined Borough Manager “Mud” Moore (right) in a ribbon cutting and unveiling ceremony dedicating the Sergeant Bruce C. Maynard Bridge on Seventh Street. American Legion Post 192, represented above by Dick Chapell, participated in a moving ceremony that recalled Maynard’s heroism. Several other family members attended. The son of Alfred and Blanche Neefe Maynard, Bruce graduated from Coudersport Area

High School in

1965 and joined the Army.

He served for four years and had signed up for another six years when he was killed in action on June 6, 1969, at the age of 26. In a small town in the Tay Ninh Province, Maynard rounded the corner of a building, stood in the doorway, looked inside and was shot by an individual there.

Many of his high school classmates as well as his nephew, Darrell, and grandnephew, J.T., were among those attending the ceremony. Highlight was the unveiling of a sign designating the Sgt. Bruce C. Maynard Bridge.

Moore and Coudersport Mayor Wick Furman detailed the long ordeal of replacing the dilapidated Seventh Street bridge with the nondescript concrete structure that will accommodate traffic over the Allegheny River to East Seventh Street, Woodlawn Avenue and Coudersport Area Recreation Park for decades.

The old bridge was moved to Fourth Street, where it was installed over the Allegheny to accommodate pedestrian and bicycle traffic.

Eighty percent of the total cost of $1.9 million was provided by the federal government. Another 15 percent came from PennDOT, while Coudersport Borough paid the remaining $95,000.

Moore said he was pleased that the multi-faceted project preserved the original bridge, which is historically significant, while providing the borough with an opportunity to honor the ultimate sacrifice made by Bruce Maynard.

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