2018-04-14 / Community Life

War monument work begins soon


Attending a check presentation to American Legion Post 194 from revenue the state has collected through a shale gas drill­ing impact fee were (from left): Commissioner Jim Thomas, 1st Vice Commander Ralph Grovanz, Commissioner Lori Reed, Commander Mick Fapore, Adjutant Mary Greif, Finance Of­ficer Barry Sarick, 2nd Vice Commander Billy Hostetlar and Commissioner Phil Jones. Attending a check presentation to American Legion Post 194 from revenue the state has collected through a shale gas drill­ing impact fee were (from left): Commissioner Jim Thomas, 1st Vice Commander Ralph Grovanz, Commissioner Lori Reed, Commander Mick Fapore, Adjutant Mary Greif, Finance Of­ficer Barry Sarick, 2nd Vice Commander Billy Hostetlar and Commissioner Phil Jones. Donations for restoration work on the Cameron County World War I Monu­ment will soon pass the $80,000 milestone, thanks to an outpour­ing of support from community organiza­tions, individuals and local officials.

As a result, work is expected to begin before the end of the month.

The visible land­mark at the courthouse square tells a story all its own.

It was built in 1929 as the World War Monument, in the belief that World War I would truly be the “war to end all wars,” as it was labeled. Private donations and a contribution from the American Legion covered the costs.

Fundraising for the current work has come together quickly. Most recently, the Cameron County Board of Com­missioners approved a $25,000 allotment from the county’s share of a state tax on shale gas production. That comes on top of the $40,000 contribution from the George and Margaret Mee Chari­table Foundation.

Officials report that a $30,000 grant from the Emporium Foun­dation is also in the works. Olkosky-Jessup American Legion Post 194 members have also raised more than $23,000 on their own through various fund­raising events.

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